Photography

photography for graphic designTo add impact to your website and greater interest to your marketing literature you’ll require attractive and relevant imagery. And sometimes the only way to acquire those images is to brief a professional photographer. Don’t let a bad photo ruin a good story. Low resolution, blurry photos snapped on your mobile are never going to sell your products and services to your customers. Show your company to its best advantage by investing in excellent photo-imagery. And, while you’re having product or location shots taken for a specific project, you’re also potentially building up a photo library of imagery that you can use time and again in different media. Which means you’ll get excellent value for money from a well-managed photo-shoot.

 

Why not ask to see MARKUS‘s photography portfolio?

 

The first photo posted on the web…

A picture of the parody pop group Les Horribles Cernettes was the first photo to be scanned and published on the Web in 1992. This female pop quartet was founded by Michele de Gennaro, a graphic designer at CERN where the world wide web originated.

 

A short history of photography:

Early photography often suffered from the time required to capture an image. One successful early photographic method that proved popular for portraits was the Daguerreotype developed by Frenchman Louis Daguerre and introduced to the public in 1839. One major drawback with this metal-based process was that it only allowed one copy of an image. This problem was overcome by the British scientist, politician and inventor, William Henry Fox Talbot, who created the negative process where numerous copies of the same positive image could be produced. The first commercially-produced book illustrated with photographs was published in six instalments by Fox Talbot during the years 1844 and 1846. The Pencil of Nature was the term this pioneering photographer used to describe the creation of images using natural light and light-sensitive paper. The negative process was the same basic method that continued to be used right up to the development of the digital technology that is now used to create digital images that can be reproduced directly without the need of an intervening negative stage.